Schneider and Louisville’s Green Initiative

by Vikramaditya Jhunjhunwala

In the spring of 2011, the mayor of Louisville created a commission dedicated to planting more trees. This commission was to be co-chaired by none other than Katy Schneider, former deputy mayor of Louisville and advocate of environmental issues. Madeline Ostrander (2016) outlines Schneider’s efforts in creating a healthier environment for her city, and reminds the people of urban America of the environmental dangers their concrete worlds face in the absence of greenery.

Ostrander recounts that Schneider’s journey began in early 2012 when Schneider approached Brian Stone, a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, to find out the extent of temperature changes in Louisville. Stone proceeded to reveal that Louisville’s temperature had increased by about 1.7 degrees every decade since 1960. Stone also noticed that urban areas were heating more than rural areas. He discovered that this situation was primarily caused by what meteorologists call the urban heat-island effect whereby dark and paved surfaces absorb solar radiation consequently causing the air temperature to rise. Continue reading

Identifying Suitable Trees For Urban Heat Management In Face Of Global Warming

by Deniz Korman

Global ambient temperatures keep rising year by year, and urban areas specifically experience higher temperatures compared to rural areas due to lower vegetation coverage and increased emissions. An effective strategy to counteract this problem is to expand green spaces and improve urban forestry. However, it is important to ensure that the greenery that we integrate into our cities can withstand changing climate conditions as ambient temperatures keep increasing at a rate faster than ever. Lanza and Stone (2016) focus on how global warming has affected the climate conditions around 20 highly populated metropolitan areas in USA, and the impact that this has had on present tree species. Continue reading