Marine Mollusc Anti-predator Escape Behavior Impaired with Future Ocean Acidification

by Jennifer Fields

Ocean acidification is known to have significant impacts on marine invertebrates in terms of calcification and reproduction; however, the effects of increased CO2 on marine invertebrate behavior are largely unknown. Watson et al. (2014) predicted marine conch snail predator-escape behavior to its predator cone shell would be impaired with near-future CO2 levels. The authors found that the decision-making of the conch snail was in fact impaired by ocean acidification, leaving the snails more vulnerable to predation. The change in behavior was fully restored by treatment with gabazine, suggesting that changes in acid-base regulation caused by increased CO2 in the ocean interfere with the invertebrate’s neurotransmitter receptor function. These alterations in behavior in marine invertebrates could have wide-ranging implications for the whole entire marine ecosystem. Continue reading

Elevated CO2 Affects Tropical Marine Fish Predator-Prey Interactions

by Jennifer Fields

Recent research has demonstrated that exposure to elevated CO2 affects how fish observe their environment, affecting behavioral and cognitive processes leading to increased prey mortality. However, it is unknown if increased prey mortality is caused by changes in kinematics of predator-prey interactions or from just increasing prey activity levels. Allan et al. (2013) studied the effect of anticipated end of this century CO2 concentrations on the predatory-prey interaction of two tropical marine fish. Both a predator and prey fish was exposed to present day and elevated CO2 levels in a cross-factored design. The authors investigated the changes in locomotion performance, prey reaction distance, and capture success of the interaction. Authors found that predators Continue reading