Could Climate Change Cause Famines?

by Caroline Chmiel

More than ever, the rapid growth of the world population is causing a heightened demand for food. Making this struggle infinitely worse is climate change. Per decade, food demand rises by 14%. Climate change reduces wheat yields by 2% compared to the amount without climate change, and corn yields by 1%. The demand for food causes worry and stress, so the idea that climate change worsens an already critical situation makes the fight to feed billions even harder. This is the bleak picture painted by Eduardo Porter writing in the New York Times. Food price spikes because of increased demand strongly correlate with urban unrest. From temperature changes due to global warming, production of crops can change. Less than expected production often causes producers to ban exports and importers to try to hoard the crop. Overall, commodity markets experience chaos and strain further than just feeding people. The culmination of climate change, increased population and demand for food leads to a serious question about the possibility of famine. More likely, though, is a volatile world full of wars over substances. The most highly affected population will be the poor, unable to afford increased food prices. Continue reading

Could Climate Change Cause Famines?

by Caroline Chmiel

More than ever, the rapid growth of the world population is causing a heightened demand for food. Making this struggle infinitely worse is climate change. Per decade, food demand rises by 14%. Climate change reduces wheat yields by 2% compared to the amount without climate change, and corn yields by 1%. The demand for food causes worry and stress, so the idea that climate change worsens an already critical situation makes the fight to feed billions even harder. This is the bleak picture painted by Eduardo Porter writing in the New York Times. Food price spikes because of increased demand strongly correlate with urban unrest. From temperature changes due to global warming, production of crops can change. Less than expected production often causes producers to ban exports and importers to try to hoard the crop. Overall, commodity markets experience chaos and strain further than just feeding people. The culmination of climate change, increased population and demand for food leads to a serious question about the possibility of famine. More likely, though, is a volatile world full of wars over substances. The most highly affected population will be the poor, unable to afford increased food prices. Continue reading

Effect of Climate fluctuations on Fisheries in a Sub-Arctic Environment

by Neha Vaingankar

Climate change influences marine ecosystems in different ways. For example, fishery management plans fail because of unanticipated changes. Intense exploitation of fisheries may lead to bottom-up control of the food chain and greater sensitivity to climate change. Because climate change occurs so slowly, it is difficult for scientists to see the ecosystem impacts right away, but gradually, the effects become evident in the interactions between fishing and environmental variability. In this paper Durant et al. (2013) aim to explore the effects of fishing and climate change on the structure of populations of sub-Arctic ecosystems, especially when it comes to temperature fluctuations and fishing-induced changes in spatial and demographic population structure. They are particularly interested in shifts in spatial and demographic population structure that affect the recruitment and population growth rate. The results show some patterns as well as differences in the relative importance of fishing and climate on the populations and ecosystems examined. Continue reading