Scientists Link Colony Collapse Disorder to Stressed Young Bees

by Trevor Smith

Colony Collapse Disorder, which has troubled beekeepers across the nation and world over the last decade, has been linked this week to stressed young bees, The Guardian reports. Recent developments in bee populations have forced younger bees to leave the hive to forage much earlier than they might otherwise. The stress of these journeys is likely too much for the younger bees’ bodies, which have not finished fully developing; younger bees are not able to make as many journeys in their lives between the hive and the outer world as bees who leave the hive as adults. The result, argues an article in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), is a hive-wide social imbalance that accelerates collapse (Perry et al. 2015). Continue reading

Modelling Influence of Climate Change on Global Malaria Distribution

by Amelia Hamiter

Malaria is an infectious disease which has significantly affected global human populations throughout history. Its impact declined greatly throughout the 20th century in many regions due to extensive intervention efforts, though it continues to be found in tropical areas such as parts of Africa. Like other vector-borne diseases, though, the distribution and “seasonal activity” of malaria could potentially be altered by global climate change. One way to prepare for changes in patterns of malaria outbreaks is to model scenarios of change under different climate outcomes. Continue reading