The Blind Side of Climate Change Economics

by Rachel Ashton Lim

How accurate are the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) economic estimates of Climate Change-induced damage? A post-Paris agreement review of its Fifth Assessment Report (Stern, 2016) calls for an imperative revision to its economic model. The review’s main suggestion is for the social science to become better integrated with the natural sciences in order to accurately evaluate the economic consequences of Climate Change, which are direr than is currently estimated. However, the review also suggests that the benefits of transitioning to low-carbon growth are underestimated in the report and must be evaluated more holistically. Combined, these two factors will enable the public, private and non-profit sectors to make decisions that will drive the world into the net-zero carbon economy it must achieve within this century. Continue reading

The Blind Side of Climate Change Economics

by Rachel Ashton Lim

How accurate are the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) economic estimates of Climate Change-induced damage? A post-Paris agreement review of its Fifth Assessment Report (Stern, 2016) calls for an imperative revision to its economic model. The review’s main suggestion is for the social science to become better integrated with the natural sciences in order to accurately evaluate the economic consequences of Climate Change, which are drier than is currently estimated. However, the review also suggests that the benefits of transitioning to low-carbon growth are underestimated in the report and must be evaluated more holistically. Combined, these two factors will enable the public, private and non-profit sectors to make decisions that will drive the world into the net-zero carbon economy it must achieve within this century. Continue reading

Honey I Raised the Kids Wrong

by Jassmin Del Rio

As climate change begins to transform the planet, those who inhabit it will subsequently need to change their practices and customs. Eichler (2015) focuses on changes in how children will be raised with the consequences of climate change on the horizon. She highlights the importance of teaching children to be resilient. To distinguish between those who are resilient and those who are not, she tells a personal story, about a time when a power outage hit her town and lasted for five days. She was out of the country during the outage but when she returned, she asked two friends about the experience. The first friend told her that she made the best of the outage by having a campfire and spending time with friends, a resilient response in Eichler’s view. When Eichler asked the second friend about the outage, she said that it was a “difficult” experience that took her a long time to recover from. Eichler points out that resilience, the ability to bounce back when faced with adversity, is lacking in many but will soon be necessary to withstand the hardships that climate change will bring. Continue reading

Does No-Till Agriculture Practices Mitigate Climate Change?

by Russell Salazar

The Emissions Gap Report 2013 published by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) may be providing a misleading emphasis on the conversion to no-till agriculture. Powlson et al. (2014) argues that, while there are data to support a correlation between no-till practices and increased carbon sequestration at certain soil depths, many other findings have been overlooked or understated, potentially skewing the focus of climate change mitigation initiatives. The UNEP and the agricultural sector may need to revise their action plans for the coming years. Continue reading

Effect of Non-Stationary Climate on Infectious Gastroenteritis Transmission in Japan

by Allison Hu

Infectious gastroenteritis, otherwise known as the stomach flu, is a medical condition from inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that involves both the stomach and the small intestine, causing a combination of diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and cramping. This common disease contributes significantly to the 1 billion episodes of diarrhea and 3 million deaths in children under 5 years of age per year, and is the fifth-leading cause of death worldwide (Onozuka et al. 2014). The transmission of infectious gastroenteritis is rather complex, involving both host and environmental factors. Continue reading