Climate Change and Resource Competition

by Marina de Castro Deus

Species that live in competition are always susceptible to shifts in competitive abilities. Variable conditions such as temperature, rainfall, soil condition, food availability, and many other environmental factors may result in different responses. Higher temperatures related to climate change have the potential to dramatically change how species interact. If one considers the large time scale from the time species originated often millions of years ago, recent climate change is relatively fast. Each population responds differently and may be benefited or harmed with these changes. Those that benefit from warmer temperatures can adversely alter the organisms they interact with. Continue reading

Effect of Climate fluctuations on Fisheries in a Sub-Arctic Environment

by Neha Vaingankar

Climate change influences marine ecosystems in different ways. For example, fishery management plans fail because of unanticipated changes. Intense exploitation of fisheries may lead to bottom-up control of the food chain and greater sensitivity to climate change. Because climate change occurs so slowly, it is difficult for scientists to see the ecosystem impacts right away, but gradually, the effects become evident in the interactions between fishing and environmental variability. In this paper Durant et al. (2013) aim to explore the effects of fishing and climate change on the structure of populations of sub-Arctic ecosystems, especially when it comes to temperature fluctuations and fishing-induced changes in spatial and demographic population structure. They are particularly interested in shifts in spatial and demographic population structure that affect the recruitment and population growth rate. The results show some patterns as well as differences in the relative importance of fishing and climate on the populations and ecosystems examined. Continue reading