Climate Change Effects on Airborne Pathogenic Bioaerosol Concentrations

by Shaina Van Stryk

The presence of extreme atmospheric changes due to global warming has raised questions about possible secondary effects on public health. Climate change has been shown to affect meteorological conditions such as wind speed, global radiation, and humidity. The same meteorological conditions influence the concentrations and transmissions of a variety of airborne bacteria and viruses, which may establish the possibility of a relationship between climate change and airborne pathogenic bioaerosol concentrations.   Continue reading

Analysis of Heat Exposure on Health and Socioeconomic Impact

by Jasmine Kaur

One big factor of climate change that is reducing human performance and work capacity is heat exposure. Currently, in hot areas, 10% of daylight hours are too hot for work to be performed and by 2085, the loss of productivity working hours will have increased to 30-40%. The hot areas are Africa, Asia, Latin America, and at moderate risk are southeast and southwest United States. In these hot atmospheres the heat transfer of the intrabody to the external environment and away from the body is limited. The influence of heat exposure is causing the core body temperature to rise that leads to serious physiological risks. Mainly affected are the cardiovascular system with limitations of blood flow, increased heart rate, and conspicuous sweating. As climate change progresses the incidences of occupational health problems will rise, and labor productivity and work capacity will fall. Continue reading

Climate Change Impacts Human Health

 

 

 

 

 

by Kaylee Anderson

Climate change has been found to play a role in many health issues across the globe because of the broad range of its effects on the environment.Franchini et al. (2015) do a current review showing that the increased temperatures, greater frequency of extreme weather events, increased air pollution, decreased safe water, and lower crop yields are only some of the impacts on our planet. The impact on these resources can be correlated which many public health issues. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, affect several components of health, including, higher morality and greater susceptibility to chronic respiratory and cardiovascular disease and can also exacerbate pre-existing respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Heat waves are typically associated with drought, contributing greatly to the occurrence of wildfires, and therefore, increases in smoke emissions, which are correlated with increased hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular problems.

Additionally, drought and heat have adverse effects on food production. Many low-income countries are seeing higher death rates of children under 5 due to malnutrition-induced pneumonia. In low-income countries, the drought forces lesser quality of hygiene, which ultimately increases the frequency of diarrheal diseases.

Lastly, the air quality worsens due to particulate matter, which can enter the blood stream and increase premature mortality. Aeroallergens are also more prevalent, which has led to more allergy-related hospitalizations and higher rates of allergic sensitization.

Ultimately, climate change influences a broad range of health issues, including nutrition, infectious diseases, allergies, and cardiovascular disease.

Franchini, M. & Mannucci, P.M.,2015. Impact on human health of climate changes. Eur. J. Intern. Med. 26, 1-5.

 

 

 

Improving Food Yield in Africa

by Tyler Dean

According to an article in Appropriate Technology in 2014, climate change is predicted to increase the number of malnourished people in Sub-Saharan Africa by nearly forty percent by 2050, from the current 22 million, to 355 million. In East and Central Africa, suitable areas for growing beans could decline up to eighty percent, while areas suitable for growing bananas could decline twenty-five percent. In aggregate, climate change will severely lower crop yields by adversely affecting the length of the growing season and rainfall. It is crucial for African farmers to switch to “climate- smart agriculture”(CSA). CSA will increase resilience by allowing farmers to adapt to climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The government has implemented monitored subsidy programs, consultants and aggregators in order to improve production and instill confidence in Africa’s farmers. Continue reading

Using Cloud Computing to Monitor Climate Change

by Tyler Dean

The department of Biomedical Engineering at the Adhiyamaan College of Engineering has proposed a system that provides monitoring benefits to a large number of users by deploying a collection of observed data over a long period of time. The system uses a combination of advanced technologies to collect comprehensible environmental data that can be accessed from any location online. The system requires sensors for air pollution, temperature and humidity of a selected place. The data acquisition system acquires the data of temperature, humidity, pollution of air including Illumination, dust, carbon dioxide, ultraviolet, wind direction, wind speed, air pressure and the altitude from remote sensing areas .The system can be used for intrusion detection, used to remotely monitor the conditions of a place, to determine the habitat of a place and to field conditions to specify which cultivation is suitable for a region. Continue reading

Climate Change and Its Effect on Human Health.

by Tyler Dean

Anththropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are leading to climate changes in temperature, precipitation, humidity and/or wind patterns(Natural clmate forcing also contribute to this). Climate changes yeild environmental effects that cause adaptation and health effects. The environtmental effects include: change in frequency, severity and geography of extreme weather events, ecosystem changes on land and sea that effect numerous species, rises in sea level that cause storm surges and salination of costal land and freshwater, and environmental degradation on land, costal ecosystems and fisheries. The health effects include: thermal stress that causes deaths, illness and injury from floods, storms, cyclones and bush fires (thermal stresses also effect food yields), microbial proliferation that leads to food poisoning and unsafe drinking water, increase in vector-pathogen-
host relations and in infectious disease geography/seasonality, impaired crops, livestock and fisheries yield that leads to impaired nutrition, health, survival and loss of livelihood that leads to poverty and adverse health such as mental health, infectious diseases, malnutrition and other physical risks. The easiest to define climate-health relationships are related to heat waves. The harder to define climate-health relationships are from “changes in regional food yields, disruption of fisheries, loss of livelihoods, and population displacement (because of sea-level rise, water shortages, etc).” The results from this research on climate change and its effect on future human health represent an imperative contribution to international and national policy debates. 

McMichael, AJ & Woodruff, RE Climate Change and Human Health: Present and Future Risks Lancet 367.68079-3 (2006): 859-69.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/artic.le/pii/S0140673606680793