The Confusing Relationship Between Consciousness, Culture, and Climate Change

by Sarah Whitney

The Memory Network (2014) conducts a discussion where Greg Garrard talks about the difficulties of cultural and individual comprehension of climate change.

As a society, we are perplexed by the idea of climate change, and how to approach and find solutions to its many effects. As individuals, humans are puzzled by the temporality, significant scale, and contributions they can make to mitigate climate change. Identifying and understanding these blockages may help formulate meaningful solutions and sustainable practices that can be easily enacted by the public. Continue reading

Poetry and the Environment

by Emily Segal

Because our emotions can be equally as important as rationality in decision-making, obstacles to living sustainably can relate to our feelings and attitudes as well as scientific and political issues. Ecocritics believe that approaching climate change from an interdisciplinary perspective, using literature to explore how humans relate to nature, can be helpful. Poets, for example, are experts at exploring the relationship between our internal and external worlds. This can be used to address one of the problems in understanding climate change—it is such a grand concept that it can be difficult to relate to on an individual level. As Garrard (2014) and climate scientist Mike Hulme suggest, it might be time for us to stop thinking about sustainable living and development as a ‘fight against climate change’ and rather deal with the idea of climate change from a more constructive and creative perspective. Poems are a good way to understand climate change because they have flexible structures and multiple levels of meaning, which can be useful in explaining the complex relationship between humans and the environment. Continue reading