Angling Industry Threatened by Climate Change

by Patrick Shore

A study conducted by Penn State University revealed that climate change is threatening one of our countries oldest and most beloved past times: fishing. Research conducted by Dr. Tyrell DeWeber indicates that rising air and river water temperatures in the eastern United States will drive the brook trout upstream in search of colder water. Dr. DeWeber predicts that anglers may be forced to travel up to 450 miles in the near future to fish for brook trout. The disappearance of these fish is detrimental to many states who use fishing license fees to fund wildlife conservation, as well as to many outdoor stores and other small businesses associated with angling. Trout anglers spent $3.6 billion in 2011, which translated to an estimated $8.3 billion total economic impact, supporting thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollar in salaries and tax revenues. Continue reading

The Effect of Climate Change on Prawn Fishing in Bangladesh

by Shelby Long

Nearly 400,000 Bangladeshi people are financially dependent on the fresh water prawn market. Bangladesh offers the natural resources and ideal climate to support prawn farming from wild postlarvae. In 2002, a ban was placed on the fishing of wild postlarvae by the Department of Fisheries in Bangladesh. However, this ban is not strongly enforced, so many locals who rely on the market to make a living continue to fish. Ahmed et al. (2013) examines the effect of climate change on prawn fishing in the Pasur River through variables, including cyclones, salinity, sea level rise, water temperature, flood, rainfall, and drought. The Pasur River ecosystem, more specifically the prawn postlarvae, is highly vulnerable to climate changes because it is only one meter above sea level. Researchers surveyed and interviewed local fishermen, government fisheries officers, policymakers, and non-governmental organization workers. They also conducted focus group discussions with fishers and local community members regarding the various climate-affected variables under study. Ahmed et al. determined that prawn postlarvae catch has gradually decreased by approximately 15% over the past five years, with cyclones being the most significant climatic variable affecting the catch. Decreases in postlarvae prawn catch impact the health and socioeconomic well-being of local fishermen, many of which are women and children. Continue reading

Hawaiian Marine Protected Areas Produce Spillover

by Katie Huang

Marine protected areas (MPAs) can be beneficial to fisheries through spillover effects, which occur when protected fish stocks recover and migrate into open areas. As a result, fishers tend to react by increasing fishing pressure near MPA boundaries to capitalize on these biomass gradients. To supplement previous research on spillover, Stamoulis and Friedlander (2013) studied a Hawaiian MPA with a new seascape approach that incorporated habitat variables, multiple scales of study, and information on fishing pressure. They took visual surveys of fish populations both targeted and not targeted for conservation along random transects and determined their biomass, species abundance, and density in protected and open areas. The authors found that all fish wellbeing measures were observed to be significantly higher inside the reserve. Also, as distance increased from the MPA boundaries, biomass decreased for resource fish but remained constant for non-resource fish, indicating the existence of a spillover gradient. Although fishing was more concentrated near MPA borders, current harvest rates are sustainable for the time being. The authors suggest that similar comprehensive studies be made throughout Hawaii but that further research should also include analysis on larval and egg export, a second benefit to fisheries besides spillover. Continue reading