Climate Change Policy and Ethics

by Alejandro Sandell-Gandara

In “Why Climate Change is an Ethical Problem,” Stephen Gardiner describes the ethical dilemma that policy makers face when deciding how and to what extent we should combat the adverse effects of climate change. We often confront ethical challenges by adhering to a personal moral code in which we can identify right from wrong and make decisions by weighing sacrifice against the benefits to obtain the best relative outcome. The issue that Gardiner highlights is that not everyone shares the same ethical outlook, which leads to discrepancies in policy making. Continue reading

Combating Climate Change with Religion

by Riley Hoffman

In her article “Can Science and Religion Respond to Climate Change?” (2015), Mary E. Tucker acknowledges the flaws of science and religion but suggests many ways that if the two were able to unite, the world could know how better to respond to global climate change. Her article explains that in order for true change to occur, the public needs the scientific base knowledge and an incentive, or an ethical reason, to pursue these changes.

Tucker proposes twelve ways for policy makers to induce change if science and religion came together. The first two ways describe how we need to change our perspective on global climate change. It cannot be treated as a side effect of economic growth; climate change would not be inevitable within if developed countries succeeded in reversing the effects that their emissions caused. Along those lines, she also suggests that Earth shouldn’t be seen as a tool for us, but instead as something that needs to be preserved and used sparingly to ensure long-term fitness. Continue reading

The Morality, Ethics, and Values of Climate Change-Related Decision-Making

by Russell Salazar

What must a socially responsible organization do in the midst of a changing climate? Besio and Pronzini (2014) write that discourse on climate change has been transforming into a moral debate, and businesses and organizations must react. They take a closer look at the use of morality as a communicative tool, and analyze its relationship with the decision-making processes of organizations with regard to sustainability. Continue reading