Global Warming Reduction by Switching to Healthy Diets

by Shelby Long

The consumption of food and beverages accounts for 22–31% of total private consumption greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU (Tukker et al. 2009). More specifically, the production of meat and dairy products tend to produce greater GHG emissions (Audsley et al. 2009). Saxe et al. (2012) examine how different diets, which are composed of different foods, are associated with varying potential GHG emissions. They use consequential Life Cycle Assessment to compare the emissions, or global warming potential (GWP), from food production for an Average Danish Diet (ADD), the Nordic Nutritional Recommendations (NNR), and a New Nordic Diet (NND), which was developed by the OPUS Project. They determined that the GHG emissions association with NNR and NND were lower than those associated with ADD, by 8% and 7%, respectively. When taking into account the transport of food, NND emissions are 12% less than ADD emissions. With regard to organic versus conventional food production, GHG emissions are 6% less for NND than for the ADD. Saxe et al. adjusted NND to include less beef and more organic produce, and they substituted meat with legumes, dairy products, and eggs, which made the diet more climate-friendly. As a result of this adjustment, the GHG emissions associated with NDD was 27% less than emissions for ADD. Continue reading