The Impact of Climate Change on Aedes aegypti Behavior in Latin America and the Caribbean

by Shannon O’Neill

Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) has impacted precipitation and temperatures, which have been associated with increases in seasonal outbreaks of dengue fever. However, such correlations are often speculative due to the complexity of interactions involved in vector-borne diseases. Researchers Chadee and Martinez (2015) focused on the adaptive behaviors of the Aedes aegypti mosquito in efforts to fill some of the research gaps typically associated with the research of these diseases. This mosquito is a successful vector for various vector-borne diseases, including dengue fever, Zika virus, and chikungunya, and has shown adaptive behaviors. This research will provide the information to create better vector control strategies that can be applied in order to limit climate change impacts on the resurgence of these diseases. Continue reading

The Influence of Climate Change on global distributions of Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Species

by Kaylee Anderson

The global distribution of human cases of dengue and other mosquito-transmitted disease presents a serious health problem, especially considering the diseases have spread significantly in recent years. Although there is considerable research on the global distribution of these diseases, there is a second concern: range expansion by vector species. In recent years, the two main mosquito vectors, Aedes aegypti and albopictus have spread to more regions, including lower and middle latitudes, introducing ‘forest diseases’ to humans. Ae. aegypti is thought to be responsible for most massive outbreaks of dengue, so its future geographical distribution is important to predict. Continue reading

Asian Tiger Mosquito Targets Humans and Pets

by Emil Morhardt

As a follow-on to the previous post, this paper was just published a week ago and makes it clear that all the targets of Asian Tiger Mosquitos—transmitters of dengue, La Crosse, and chikungunya viruses in the Northeastern US—are mammals, and most of them are humans, cats, and dogs. Humans were targeted more in the suburbs, and cats in the cities. This is quite different from Culex mosquitos, another major vector of human diseases, which primarily feed on birds. Ari Faraji and his coauthors found this out by trapping mosquitos in central New Jersey, then sequencing the DNA in their blood meals. Mammalian blood constituted 84% of the meals, with humans making up 52%, cats 21%, and dog 12%. The rest came from mammals also, including, opossums, squirrels, rabbits, and deer.

Central New Jersey is at the northern limit of these mosquitos at the moment, but climate Continue reading

Asian Tiger Mosquitoes Expanding in Northeastern US

by Sarah King

Mosquitoes are known for dispersing many different kinds of diseases that affect human health. Asian tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus), originating in Southeast Asia, are among the most invasive and widespread species of mosquitoes in the world. This species has been the cause of the reemergence of several mosquito-borne diseases such as chikungunya and dengue, and in the United States it is largely responsible for the reemergence of West Nile Virus. Using census information, temperature data, precipitation data, CO2 emissions forecasts, and generated maps of Ae. albopictus population distributions, Rochlin and his collgues (2013) statistically modeled projections of Ae. albopictus expansion through the next seventy years (2020s, 2050s, and 2080s). Their modeling shows that the range of Ae. albopictus will grow over the next seventy years to Continue reading