Climate Change and the 2016 Presidential Election

by Jesse Jennings

In the 2016 race for the White House, Republican candidates were tilting farther right on the issue of global warming, while the left-wing candidates are promising stronger mandates on carbon emissions. Although there is no consensus when it comes to climate change and it’s legitimacy, right-winged voters agree that climate change should not be a top priority of government officials—recent poll data show that a mere 3% of GOP primary voters think global warming should be on the agenda. Thirty percent of Democrat voters and 11% of swing voters think it should be a priority. Climate change seems to be more of a political pawn which either could hurt or help a nominee’s campaign, dependent on party. Standing in the middle could be more detrimental as Mike McKenna (R), an energy and environmental lobbyist, warns that “staying in one place”—either wholly believing or wholly denying climate change—will prevent political damage to yourself. But whether or not they believe in climate change and it’s place on the agenda, both parties are using it to gain votes in upcoming elections. Continue reading

Climate Change and the 2016 Presidential Election

by Jesse Jennings

In the 2016 race for the White House, Republican candidates are tilting farther right on the issue of global warming, while the left-wing candidates are promising stronger mandates on carbon emissions. Although there is no consensus when it comes to climate change and it’s legitimacy, right-winged voters agree that climate change should not be a top priority of government officials—recent poll data show that a mere 3% of GOP primary voters think global warming should be on the agenda. Thirty percent of Democrat voters and 11% of swing voters think it should be a priority. Climate change seems to be more of a political pawn which either could hurt or help a nominee’s campaign, dependent on party. Standing in the middle could be more detrimental as Mike McKenna (R), an energy and environmental lobbyist, warns that “staying in one place”—either wholly believing or wholly denying climate change—will prevent political damage to yourself. But whether or not they believe in climate change and it’s place on the agenda, both parties are using it to gain votes in upcoming elections. Continue reading

Climate Change to Social Injustice

by Alejandro Sandell-Gandara

A Wall Street Journal piece titled “California’s Climate Change Revolt” remarks on Jerry Brown’s attention towards re-branding California as a “Model of green virtue” through new anti-carbon regulations. However, these new regulations are creating a division in Brown’s party as 21 Democratic Assembly members argue against the bill on the grounds that it disproportionately harms middle- and low-income communities. Jerry Brown’s bill mandates a cut in state greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels and reduction in state wide oil consumption in vehicles by 50% while maintaining a cap-and-trade program which requires oil refiners and power plants to purchase carbon emission permits. Continue reading