Angling Industry Threatened by Climate Change

by Patrick Shore

A study conducted by Penn State University revealed that climate change is threatening one of our countries oldest and most beloved past times: fishing. Research conducted by Dr. Tyrell DeWeber indicates that rising air and river water temperatures in the eastern United States will drive the brook trout upstream in search of colder water. Dr. DeWeber predicts that anglers may be forced to travel up to 450 miles in the near future to fish for brook trout. The disappearance of these fish is detrimental to many states who use fishing license fees to fund wildlife conservation, as well as to many outdoor stores and other small businesses associated with angling. Trout anglers spent $3.6 billion in 2011, which translated to an estimated $8.3 billion total economic impact, supporting thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollar in salaries and tax revenues. Continue reading

Cutting Trees and Cutting Corners

by Patrick Shore

Around the world, deforestation is exacerbating climate change and disrupting the lives of people living in forested areas. Since the Paris climate meetings in 2015, multiple schemes and policies have been created to protect more forested areas around the world and to help forest residents displaced by deforestation. While these schemes seem mostly beneficial and functional on paper, they are well short of ideal. For example, in Madagascar have revealed that that the World Bank compensation funds intended for displaced people, are not reaching a large portion of them. The primary receivers of the money are the people easiest to reach physically who also tend to be wealthier and more well-connected; poverty-stricken people living in the deeper regions of forests where much of the logging is done are least likely to receive funds. Continue reading

Economic Blues (Oceanic Ones)

by Patrick Shore

While many impacts of climate change can be physically seen or experienced, such as abnormal weather and storm patterns and glacial retraction, the unknown and vast nature of our ocean makes changes less visible and understandable. It does seem certain though that seemingly small oceanic changes such as rising sea levels and surface temperatures could have devastating impacts across the globe. These small changes can indirectly affect weather global weather patterns: snowpacks, rainfall, harvests, soil fertility, and storms. Aside from the physical impacts of ocean climate change, such as the flooding of coastal and lowland cities, the changes to our oceans could have more immediate, economic effects. Continue reading